What Is All the Buzz About?

The news is out! The Shingo Institute has launched a new workshop, called SYSTEMS DESIGN, which has been in development for several months. After several successful pilot sessions, we are excited to release this new course to the general public starting in November 2019. Continue reading “What Is All the Buzz About?”

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“Operational Excellence” or “Enterprise Excellence”?

by Ken Snyder

A few decades ago, we changed the name of the Shingo Prize to the Shingo Prize for Operational Excellence. This was appropriate at the time because the Prize was meant mainly for manufacturers, and applicants for the Prize were mainly the production facilities of manufacturing organizations. At the time, the assessment model we used consisted only of systems, tools, and results. Continue reading ““Operational Excellence” or “Enterprise Excellence”?”

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A Study in Principles that Drive Habitual Excellence

by Paul O’Neill – By Geoff Webster, Value Capture, LLC

 “Based on timeless principles, we shape cultures that drive operational excellence.”

Few leaders today embody the purpose of the Shingo Institute better than Paul O’Neill, the 72nd U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. During Paul’s tenure as CEO of Alcoa (1987–2000) and in the decade after, driven by his belief that zero safety incidents was the driving values-based goal for an ethical company, Alcoa’s lost workday incidents dropped from 1.86 to 0.09 per 100 employees per year. Driven to always find a better way (Embrace Scientific Thinking), create better conditions for employees (Respect for Every Individual, Focus on Process, Seek Perfection, Think Systemically, Create Constancy of Purpose), and to improve outcomes (Create Value for the Customer), Paul humbly led Alcoa to a sustainable state of organizational excellence that continued to improve more than a decade after his departure. Continue reading “A Study in Principles that Drive Habitual Excellence”

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Why the Shingo Model™?

by Dominic Bria

A few months ago, I had a fellow from a New Hampshire company tell me about a question an employee asked him about the Shingo Model™. He is the business improvement manager at his organization, and they are working toward challenging for the Shingo Prize. An employee asked him why the Shingo Prize is the standard toward which they chose to aspire. Continue reading “Why the Shingo Model™?”

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Should We Change the Model?

by Ken Snyder

Over the past several months, I have analyzed and discussed the Shingo Model™ on this blog and in private meetings with thought leaders. This has led to a lot of feedback from various people – both in response to Shingo blog posts, to my personal LinkedIn account, and in one-on-one conversations. I deeply appreciate the passion and commitment of so many people to the Shingo Model™! Continue reading “Should We Change the Model?”

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A Look at “Go and Observe”

by Ken Snyder

 

Soon after publishing the Shingo Model over 10 years ago, we developed workshops to teach the Model. At first, the workshops were classroom-only experiences. We soon tested the idea of “go to gemba[1] as part of the workshop. We quickly realized that including “go to gemba” was a far superior teaching method. Since then, we include a “go to gemba” experience in all workshops and build an experience about each of the 10 Shingo Guiding Principles. Continue reading “A Look at “Go and Observe””

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A Look at “Create Value for the Customer” and the Results Dimension

by Ken Snyder

“Create Value for the Customer” is one of the Shingo Guiding Principles in the Results dimension of the Shingo Model. In the current Model, it is the only principle in this dimension. Within the Shingo Model, our working definition of this principle is: Continue reading “A Look at “Create Value for the Customer” and the Results Dimension”

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A Look at “Create Constancy of Purpose”

by Ken Snyder

“Create Constancy of Purpose” is a principle in the Enterprise Alignment dimension of the Shingo Model™. When we developed the Shingo Model, we borrowed heavily from the best thinkers who have influenced the operational excellence movement. In the case of this principle, we borrowed the wording from Dr. W. Edwards Deming. This is the first point of Deming’s 14 points, he said:

“Create constancy of purpose toward improvement of product and service, with the aim to become competitive, stay in business, and to provide jobs.”[1] Continue reading “A Look at “Create Constancy of Purpose””

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A Look at “Think Systemically”

by Ken Snyder

“Think Systemically” is a principle in the Enterprise Alignment dimension of the Shingo Model. Through understanding the relationships and interconnectedness within a system we are able to make better decisions and improvements. This principle is largely based on the pioneering work of Russ Ackoff and Peter Senge. An example of thinking systemically is looking at the entire value stream to make improvements. Continue reading “A Look at “Think Systemically””

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NEW: Shingo Journey Page

It’s common for people who use the Shingo Model™ as a standard of excellence to talk about their organization’s “Shingo Journey” much like you hear people talk about the Lean journey. They’re talking, of course, about the evolution of their organizations toward the use of the principles prescribed by the Shingo Model. However, until now there has been no visual representation of what a Shingo Journey might look like. We recently rectified that situation with a new page on the Shingo.org website. Continue reading “NEW: Shingo Journey Page”

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